SEARCH

Enter your search query in the box above ^, or use the forum search tool.

You are not logged in.

#1 2013-05-10 02:20:31

Blue_Box
New Member
Registered: 2013-05-10
Posts: 7

Update/root password question.

Sorry if this is posted in the wrong place, but I am new here and this is my first post. If it needs to be moved I ask a mod to move it.
I've been using crunchbang-11-20130119-amd64 since it was released. I updated to crunchbang-11-20130506-amd64. Before I had a password for root in terminal. Now after the update the password does not work. I am wondering how I can get root privileges back, and change the password. I've done a little searching here and couldn't find anything that may help me. And I am still fairly new to Linux in general. Until now I've not had this problem. Could something in the update have caused the password to reset? If so, what would be the default password and how do I change it?
Any help is appreciated.

Offline

Help fund CrunchBang, donate to the project!

#2 2013-05-10 02:46:28

shengchieh
#! Die Hard
Registered: 2009-01-07
Posts: 617

Re: Update/root password question.

By default #1 has no root - use sudo.  If you really want root, create it.  Do

sudo password
[enter user password]
[enter root password twice]

Sheng-Chieh

Offline

#3 2013-05-10 02:58:24

Blue_Box
New Member
Registered: 2013-05-10
Posts: 7

Re: Update/root password question.

shengchieh wrote:

By default #1 has no root - use sudo.  If you really want root, create it.  Do

sudo password
[enter user password]
[enter root password twice]

Sheng-Chieh


I tried this and this is what I get:
chris@crunchbang:~$ sudo password
[sudo] password for chris: (Here I entered my login password)
sudo: password: command not found

And if I try again, with terminal still open, I get this:
chris@crunchbang:~$ sudo password
sudo: password: command not found


If I close terminal I get the same as the first try. Am I missing something? Or is there something else I need to do.

Offline

#4 2013-05-10 03:37:58

damo
#! gimpbanger
From: N51.5 W002.8 (mostly)
Registered: 2011-11-24
Posts: 5,188

Re: Update/root password question.

Shouldn't it be

passwd

not

password

for Change User Password?

Offline

#5 2013-05-10 10:43:33

snowpine
#!-a-roo
Registered: 2008-11-24
Posts: 2,979

Re: Update/root password question.

CrunchBang does not have a "root password' in the default install. Rather, you can use 'sudo' as explained in this helpful visual guide:

http://xkcd.com/149/

If you choose to enable a root password (completely unnecessary, and considered by some to be a security risk) use this simple command:

sudo passwd root

/hugged

Offline

#6 2013-05-10 21:24:37

Blue_Box
New Member
Registered: 2013-05-10
Posts: 7

Re: Update/root password question.

Thanks to all for the info on how to set a root password. And I do understand how it is not needed or necessary now. And, I think I should have been a bit more clear with my original post. My real problem is I can not access root. It asks for a password and if I leave it blank, and hit enter, I get Authentication error. This happens when I use the password I thought I had set for root, prior to update/upgrade, and still get that. I even changed my user password and that does not help. I want to be able to access the /etc folder for logs, and so forth. But, I can not do this with the permissions my user account has. Do I need to change my user account settings to allow this? Or can this only be done under root. Prior to this I had been able to use root, in terminal, to do these actions. Could there have been some issue when I did the update/upgrade? Sorry for the initial confusion, and thanks for any help.

Offline

#7 2013-05-10 22:49:53

CBizgreat!
#! Die Hard
Registered: 2011-07-27
Posts: 1,863

Re: Update/root password question.

Like most things gnu/nixish, you'll get many different and differing opinions. My 2 cents on it follows.

Was going to post the same command snowpine has above "sudo passwd root" Held off, cause as the OP mentioned the original post left a lot of things unclear. When you say upgraded from Statler to newest #!, assuming you mean changed sources.list and did a "apt-get dist-upgrade"?

Sidenote: Which dist-upgrade is my understanding of the proper way to upgrade a gnu/nix OS to a new version, you might've used "apt-get update && apt-get upgrade" instead. Just as a for people's info kinda thing, "apt-get upgrade" while apparently upgrades packages ... doesn't replace all packages, while "apt-get dist-upgrade" does.

Thought fresh installation was the recommended way of upgrading Crunchbang .. could be wrong ? Sounds like you don't have sudo privileges anymore ?

Could use Professor Xaos handy chroot how to. To gain root access and try to fix your #! install. Check which groups your current user belongs to, in terminal type "groups", if sudo doesn't come up, add your user to it with "adduser yourusername sudo", then log that user off n back in. You might have to un-install/reinstall sudo beforehand. Depending on the stuff below ... that being if you didn't install the maintainers files and kept your older ones instead. Could/might not hurt to start fresh, with newer package and files for that version in place.

Once when an update of sudo came out, it disabled my sudo privileges, also during that upgrade and often when updated versions of other packages come out ... Someone will be told in terminal ( can't remember if it's the same when using synaptic), that the package maintainer has released a new configuration file, then asked if you want to keep your current version of the file or replace it with the package maintainers. So if you kept your older visudo file when sudo or visudo was upgraded to a newer one/etc.

I always tend to replace it with the one from the package maintainer. In the case of sudo, that one time, noticed the syntax in visudo had changed a bit. Make sure and/or add your user to the visudo file too. Which does require elevated privileges and you can get that access using Xao's kickbutt how to.

Could also backup important personal data on that install, reinstall fresh and transfer the info you want back. Not that matters, disagree that not having a root acct is any more/less secure than relying on sudo alone. Noticed more knowledgeable crunchers and nixers here even advise people to setup a root account, cause sudo can break. Experienced that very thing shortly afterwards, though have taken to setting up a root user account on majority of gnu/nix OS's anyway. It was less pita for me to fix w a root account, when sudo broke. Honestly someone could also just use something similar to Xao's chroot how to to rescue an OS too.  Either/or ... I guess. wink Just a personal preference for me.

Just some feedback, hope it helps. Solution(s) should be in that babble somewhere, depending on what you've got going on, on your end.


Vll! smile

Last edited by CBizgreat! (2013-05-11 00:44:08)


Some common cbiz abbreviations. This will save me time and yet @ same time tell folks what the babble is supposed to mean.

Vll ! = ( Viva la gnu/Linux !)    Vl#!! = ( Viva la #! !)    Last but not least, UD ... OD ! = ( Use Debian ... or die !) tongue

Offline

#8 2013-05-11 02:08:51

ew
#! Die Hard
Registered: 2012-09-27
Posts: 1,975

Re: Update/root password question.

If you already had enabled the root account, but now for some reason the password doesn`t work, then sudo passwd root doesn`t help you, because you need the root password to change it. Anyway, this solution is from 2006, but I can not see why it wouldn`t work now in 2013... http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/linux-rese … -password/ or this one: http://www.slashgeek.net/2012/06/12/res … 5-minutes/


- apt-mark hold account

Offline

#9 2013-05-11 03:08:09

Blue_Box
New Member
Registered: 2013-05-10
Posts: 7

Re: Update/root password question.

ew wrote:

If you already had enabled the root account, but now for some reason the password doesn`t work, then sudo passwd root doesn`t help you, because you need the root password to change it. Anyway, this solution is from 2006, but I can not see why it wouldn`t work now in 2013... http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/linux-rese … -password/ or this one: http://www.slashgeek.net/2012/06/12/res … 5-minutes/

Thank you, ew! Your second link did the trick. I now have root access again. cool

@CBizgreat! I used sudo apt-get update first then I used sudo apt-get upgrade. Maybe I should have used them at the same time? I was just going off of what I know, with a little help from a friend. And thanks for the link to Xaos post, it was informative.

All in all I am really liking #! and I'm going to spend some time going through the forums here. One other thing that is really annoying to me is I can not figure out how to disable my touchpad on my HP laptop. Is there a way to do this? I've looked through Synaptic package manager and I don't see anything that can do this. I may have overlooked something. Any ideas?

Thanks again to all those who have replied! I really appreciate it!

Offline

#10 2013-05-11 11:29:59

ew
#! Die Hard
Registered: 2012-09-27
Posts: 1,975

Re: Update/root password question.

No problem, anytime.

As for the touchpad, try this command:

synclient touchpadoff=1

If that works for you, then you need to make it stick by adding it to your autostart-mechanism somehow. You can do it like this.

1. Create a new blank textfile in your private bin, in your home-folder. Name the file " touchoff".

2. Copy and paste this into the text-file you just created:

#!/bin/bash
## Disable touchpad
synclient touchpadoff=1

3. Save the file and make it executable.

4. If you named the file "touchoff" , then add this line somewhere in your autostart-file. (.config/openbox/autostart)

touchoff &

That should do it. If you want a more complexe solution that only disables the touchpad when a usb-mouse is connected, then take a look at this howto: http://crunchbang.org/forums/viewtopic.php?id=15992


- apt-mark hold account

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB

Copyright © 2012 CrunchBang Linux.
Proudly powered by Debian. Hosted by Linode.
Debian is a registered trademark of Software in the Public Interest, Inc.

Debian Logo