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#176 2013-06-28 18:38:50

pidsley
Window Mangler
Registered: 2012-05-23
Posts: 1,752

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

^ what wux said. I don't know how you got Xfce starting with 180M used, DJ, but that just doesn't look right. Here is BBQ Proof Xfce with compositing, using only 70M:
2013_06_28_183535_1280x1024_scrot.jpg
If you want a really lightweight stacking window manager, look at cwm or sithwm.
2013_06_28_120125_1280x1024_scrot.jpg

Last edited by pidsley (2013-06-28 19:03:00)

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#177 2013-06-28 19:10:26

DebianJoe
#! Code Whisperer
From: The Bleeding Edge
Registered: 2013-03-13
Posts: 1,207
Website

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Something went very awry with my last dist-upgrade. 
I also ended up with full-blown Gnome again.

This is far from over.

2013_06_28_143226_1024x768_scrot.jpg
Managed to Chop it back down to around 87M on startup...still, that's just too much.  Looking into SithWM as we speak.

Edit: So, with evilWM, I'm still hitting 52M of Ram...
2013_06_28_153418_2048x768_scrot.jpg
Thinking about backing up and punting, because that seems a bit heavy, still.

Tried out sithWM, and need to figure out how to remap keys, because I don't have a Windows/Super key on the t43.

2nd Edit:  It's something that I've screwed up.  I grabbed the 3.9.2 kernel that antiX uses, and tried it.  I'm hitting right around 38M.  Hmmmm....what did I do wrong?

3rd Edit: Found the -m switch for sithwm to change keybinds for mod.  Also, going back to try to fix whatever I've screwed up building this thing.  See you all tomorrow. big_smile

Last edited by DebianJoe (2013-06-28 21:46:30)

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#178 2013-06-28 23:27:49

DebianJoe
#! Code Whisperer
From: The Bleeding Edge
Registered: 2013-03-13
Posts: 1,207
Website

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Okay, thanks to Pidsley...cwm is mother-flipping great.  Gonna be on this one for a bit. wink  Fixing Kernel issues as well for now, killing out processes I don't use, and learning new hotkeys.

...but seriously, CWM is badass.

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#179 2013-06-28 23:35:50

pidsley
Window Mangler
Registered: 2012-05-23
Posts: 1,752

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

DebianJoe wrote:

Okay, thanks to Pidsley...cwm is mother-flipping great.  Gonna be on this one for a bit. wink  Fixing Kernel issues as well for now, killing out processes I don't use, and learning new hotkeys.

...but seriously, CWM is badass.

sithwm has a runtime config file, and so does cwm (if you used the git version)

git clone git://github.com/chneukirchen/cwm.git

Last edited by pidsley (2013-06-28 23:36:37)

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#180 2013-06-28 23:49:34

annoyingbeggar
#! Junkie
From: Florida
Registered: 2013-05-30
Posts: 430

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

wuxmedia wrote:

@anyone who'll listen - BBQ proof, was, for me, around 100Mb freshbooted.
compositing actually took up less memory.
go figure.
lightweight, seems to means low on features. re JWM/*box
hey - the new spin of oyster (nearly all the WMs in the repos) is soon to be spun. featuring freshly roasted WM's compiled for the 'Q glasses
XFCE is my boy right now. although i bloat any system out. currently knocking on the door of 400Mb/1Gb not bad seeing as IW, LO and a few terms are running.

I really wanted to try Proof but couldn't find a torrent of it and the direct download kept getting corrupted sad


“I don't believe in charity. I believe in solidarity. Charity is so vertical. It goes from the top to the bottom. Solidarity is horizontal. It respects the other person. I have a lot to learn from other people.” - Eduardo Hughes Galeano

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#181 2013-06-28 23:57:18

DebianJoe
#! Code Whisperer
From: The Bleeding Edge
Registered: 2013-03-13
Posts: 1,207
Website

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

I had a few issues with sith (even though the name really attracted me, and the homepage for the project...that guy's great).  Once I got the -m switch set up to allow me to actually do stuff, I kept seeing odd areas of text behind menus.  I thought I'd go ahead and remove it and try out cwm, and I have to admit that I'm in love.  It's just...so...smooth!

I appreciate the head's up on this one especially, and will gladly accept any more little tips or tricks you might have sitting around for them.  I'm currently watching text scroll by again in a little term-window, and playing with opening and closing and moving and resizing and whatever else with cwm while that's all going on.

@Wuxmedia:  You say that most "lightweight" means light on features.  While this is true, one man's feature is another man's bloat.  Otherwise, we'd all be dual booting with KDE and Unity.  I spend LOTS of time at command line, but every now and again, I like to have something that uses X to run.  I guess it all comes down to each user as to what features they need and can do without.

Last edited by DebianJoe (2013-06-29 00:10:34)

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#182 2013-06-29 00:06:36

pidsley
Window Mangler
Registered: 2012-05-23
Posts: 1,752

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Yeah, I really like cwm. I usually use ratpoison, but cwm is my favorite stacker. It does just enough but not too much. I have a runtime config file for it, but I use the mod4 key so it won't help you much.

My new project is a little atom board I just got -- it's sitting on my desk connected to a laptop hard drive and a power supply. I have a sid netinstall on it, and I'm trying to build a kernel for it, but with not much success so far. I may just bag it and use the stock Debian kernel. Custom kernels don't really buy you much, in my experience, and as you've seen you can waste a lot of time trying to get them just right...

(edit) and cwm does work well with xbindkeys, if you find it's easier to set up keybinds that way.

Last edited by pidsley (2013-06-29 00:10:46)

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#183 2013-06-29 00:06:58

wuxmedia
wookiee madclaw
From: Back in Blighty
Registered: 2012-03-09
Posts: 1,478
Website

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

@annoying beggar - no torrents atm,  recomended d/l is using wget -c - but lookey here Bacon has proliferated glasses
http://sourceforge.net/projects/linuxbb … CE%20Base/

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#184 2013-06-29 05:24:20

DebianJoe
#! Code Whisperer
From: The Bleeding Edge
Registered: 2013-03-13
Posts: 1,207
Website

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Okay, it's in the screenshot thread, but I finally managed to get it down to brass-tacks:
2013_06_29_001318_1024x768_scrot.jpg

This little guy looks nice, is BLAZING fast now, and I've gotten my daemon/client emacs setup running.  I don't think that it's significantly better than it would be with an "aftermarket" kernel package, like Liquorix or such.  I've still got some tweaking to do with the (lol) start menu, because I do like quick-launchers.  cwm is everything that's right with the world.

I don't mind hacking away at config files.  So far I've only totally broken my setup twice, and considering that I'm editing everything by typing it in...that's not too bad.

Last edited by DebianJoe (2013-06-29 07:17:12)

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#185 2013-06-29 07:11:20

DebianJoe
#! Code Whisperer
From: The Bleeding Edge
Registered: 2013-03-13
Posts: 1,207
Website

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

It's all been leading up to this:
Joe's "Must-Have Stuff from The FOSS World"

So, I finally got to where I really wanted to be with this project, thanks to a little help from my friends.  I'm under 35M of RAM at boot, fully-themed (or at least as full as I ever get) and running.

So, I already have gone through a lot of software in the thread, and am pretty comfortable with what I like.  For step 1, I set up the client/daemon emacs that I used on my no-X project.  I do a LOT of playing with code, and I'm an emacs junkie.  What can I say?  I also grabbed feh for the wallpaper setting, and urxvt because I prefer it to Xterm by a pretty large margin.

For step 2: MC
2013_06_29_014512_1024x768_scrot.jpg
The BBQ crew has slowly won me over to using mc over dired.  It's got a really intuitive interface, and it's easier to set up to quick-launch, although, you could strap dired to the cwm menu by opening a term and setting the emacs -nw --dired to your terminal emulator.  It's really about choice here.

Step 3: moc
2013_06_29_015234_1024x768_scrot.jpg
This choice won out over MPD because I already have .dotfiles for it...and for no other reason.

Step 4: gnuguile
I guess I should have included git and gcc, but those were more a part of BUILDING the kernel and WM than customizing.  Now that I have all of that in place, it's time to break out the Scheme some more and play with it.  Scheme is slowing working its way into my brain as one of the most interesting languages I've ever really studied.

Step 5: Ceni
2013_06_29_020041_1024x768_scrot.jpg
Ceni is a must-have for me now.  I tend to roam networks between home and the places that I go for work, and a curses interface for wpa authentication makes a big difference in the amount of time it takes to get comfortable.  Ceni is about the simplest way I've found to do what I need in the least amount of time without too much extra, at least on Debian.

Step 6: Tmux
2013_06_29_020203_1024x768_scrot.jpg
I can't NOT have tmux.  It's just too cool.  I understand that in X I can spawn windows with little terms in them everywhere, but once you get used to tabbing and hotkeyed tiling on demand in a stacker, it's just too handy to give up.

That's as far as I've gotten so far, but I'm sure to add a few more things to it as I go along.  So far, I'm so madly head-over-heels in love with this system now that I can't say enough good things about it.  Thanks to the BBQ crew for introducing me to some of the apps that I've really fallen in love with since finding them && a special thanks to Pidsley one more time for cwm.  I owe him a beer one day just for mentioning what is probably my new favorite WM.

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#186 2013-06-29 07:36:04

ivanovnegro
Ivan #000000
From: unstable madness
Registered: 2011-06-02
Posts: 5,432

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

^ Great post Joe.

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#187 2013-06-29 22:35:35

DebianJoe
#! Code Whisperer
From: The Bleeding Edge
Registered: 2013-03-13
Posts: 1,207
Website

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

I spent my day acting like a Crunchbanger.  I keep tweaking with my .cwmrc file.  So far, I've made some decent headway, but it's mostly for functionality...because I'm not that into ricing for looks.  I've got it set to 1-pixel boarders, so it's not like there's a whole lot to do there.

On the other hand, I did set up my default terminal "C+M^Return" to urxvt, and then added a chaining option so that "C+M+Shift^Return" spawns urxvt + tmux.  I've brought the little laptop back home (I worked on it some while I was working yesterday) and plugged it back into the dock for the 2nd monitor.  My wife asked me how to open windows on it.  I explained that I'd set up the right-click menu to have auto-launchers for the stuff she'd probably want to use.  She asked if our daughter could use it rather than hers to play with programming.  The conversation went something like this:

wife: So, can Ku (nickname for girl) program her python on it?
me: Sure.
wife: How does she open the little terminal thingy?
me: Control Alt Return...or if she wants a multiplexer, Control Alt Shift Return.
wife:  There's no close buttons, how do you close things?
me: Control Alt X.
wife: So, control alt shift x does.....
me: nothing yet
wife:.....so she should just use her computer?
me: Nah, this is fun.  If you use emacs, you can open a file with Control Alt Return, then "emacs -nw" and control x control f, which will allow her to pull up her file to edit.
wife:.....got you.  She's just getting hers out.

It made me chuckle a bit.  She'd be more comfortable here than the wife would be.  My wife isn't a nixer, so she doesn't get why we don't use stuff that doesn't "just werk (tm)".  I did add Mplayer to the mix, and still need to grab some of the editing themes (which means I need to set up my emacs repos, and el-get them...like a totally different OS, I swear) that I use for emacs, but so far: I've never been happier with a setup than this one.

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#188 2013-06-29 23:27:05

dkeg
#! Die Hard
From: Mid-Atlantic Grill
Registered: 2011-12-05
Posts: 724

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Great stuff Joe, really enjoy reading your posts.


grill it | the rocky path may just be the best path

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#189 2013-06-30 20:50:21

DebianJoe
#! Code Whisperer
From: The Bleeding Edge
Registered: 2013-03-13
Posts: 1,207
Website

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

I don't tend to get too philosophical, it's not very normal for me.  I tend to babble in a lighthearted manner for the sake of making people at least smile hopefully.  Today, though, let me share some thoughts.

Why did we all end up using Linux?  For somebody, somewhere, it might have been about being inexpensive, but that's not me.  For me the "free" in Linux really is about freedom.  Not in the kind of way where I insist that everyone use non-proprietary source for everything, as I don't really want to force my views on others.  Honestly, that's invading their freedom with my views.  I don't want that.

This latest build has really taught me far more about myself than it did about a very sparse X build.  I learned about a really great wm and also how to screw up building a kernel (which I haven't done since I used Gentoo), but I learned something that may extend far deeper into my soul than some technical practice probably should.  I learned that when faced with absolutely ANY choice, I tend to favor the most simple way to accomplish the goals.  I don't mean simple like "one-click install", but rather simple as in not-complex in execution.  I don't like huge walls of obfuscated dependencies.  I like tiny programs written in C that do exactly what they were designed to do, and nothing more.  Many of the best examples of this are cli-based, but some aren't.

"How is this simple?" many users might ask, "You have to build packages from source using git to pull a repo and find the dependencies manually...that's hard."  I honestly believe that the Help-and-Support forums would be far less populated if more people would really take the time to consider what I mean by simple.  Let's assume that something in Sid breaks QT4 tomorrow.  I'll never notice.  That problem won't change my daily usage at all.  I don't rely on the maintainer of the package to fix my problems for me. 

When I was using Arch on all of my systems, I used to HATE yaourt (an automated tool for the AUR).  My problem with it wasn't that it was a bad program, as it was honestly a very effective tool.  My problem stemmed from the fact that almost nobody who actually used it listened to what the package dev had said:  "You should know how to build things with makepkg BEFORE you begin to use yaourt."  What was being said may seem confusing, but really, it's the truth.  yaourt works 90% of the time, but when it doesn't you should be able to modify the package build to work.  Most people who chose yaourt did so because they wanted "X-package" but didn't want to be forced into figuring out how to build it because of the complexities involved.  This is a horrible plan with Arch, as you might be asked to move all non-official packages manually to a new directory.  If you can't do this, or figure out how to learn the process, there is a very good chance that your system will be rendered totally unusable on the next update.

So, why not just use the simple GNU/Linux that will automate everything for you?  If you use it because you choose to, then that's perfectly cool with me.  When things don't auto-magically work, though, you should be working towards learning how to deal with them.  When you have to deal with all of the complex problems that are created by automatic processes, then the simple answer is to remove the automation most of the time.  It's far easier for me to do most processes manually than to write a program without bugs that does the same thing, and if it's not...then that's a pretty useful program.  That's something that I will use.

So, I choose to stay sparse when offered ALL of the options in the world.  The reason for this is that I actually believe that simplicity is created by minimizing potential future issues.  If I don't understand it to some degree, I'd prefer to not have it.  I had a boxing coach one time that said something that will always stick with me, and it does apply to this situation in a way.

"Only a warrior chooses pacifism...everyone else if forced into it."

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#190 2013-06-30 21:17:27

ivanovnegro
Ivan #000000
From: unstable madness
Registered: 2011-06-02
Posts: 5,432

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Interesting post.

And I know why I do not use Arch:

Joey wrote:

...as you might be asked to move all non-official packages manually to a new directory.  If you can't do this, or figure out how to learn the process, there is a very good chance that your system will be rendered totally unusable on the next update.

devil

But you are right and regarding Sid, funny, you mentioned it. Now I know why people break their systems, it is too complex, what they have installed. Though I can install KDE and it still never breaks, but that is me.

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#191 2013-06-30 22:41:32

DebianJoe
#! Code Whisperer
From: The Bleeding Edge
Registered: 2013-03-13
Posts: 1,207
Website

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

@ Ivan:  I'm certainly not speaking against any setup that someone chooses.  What I am getting at is that you're you.  You know your capacities, and I know you well enough to know that if you're running KDE, it's because you want to...and not because you can't figure out another way.  I've not seen you ask recently for someone to help you understand how to get Firefox running. wink

I know me, and I like experimentation.  I do horrible things to systems just to see if they work.  Extra dependencies create more headache than they're worth in those situations for me. 

I also understand that some people are using what they use because that's the depth that they understand the system.  That's totally understandable as well.  We're were all beginners at one point.  In many cases, we're all still noobs at something (for me, that's Scheme right now....I'm happy every time I don't get a syntax error on a simple program.)

What I am certainly speaking against is self-imposed ignorance.  One of the few things that gets to me is when someone decides to use something without ever trying to understand it at all.  The "it just werks" mentality is understandable in some cases, but it doesn't play well with running bleeding-edge releases.

I've always wondered why there was an air of elitism around certain releases.  I think that telling someone "You'd probably be happier with Y-consumerist-distro than X-experimental-distro," is taken by some as an insult.  Then they don't understand why the people who've chosen to really embrace testing at some level don't wish to take the time to explain basic GNU/Linux practices to someone who's horribly borked something while running an experimental release.  I have made the statement before, "X-distro probably isn't best for you," and meant it sincerely.  It wasn't because I believe myself to be above them (I'm not), but that what they expect and what the devs can provide simply aren't the same thing.

This is a difficult thought to get across without sounding arrogant, and I certainly don't mean for it to come across like that.  I guess that to summarize correctly, it's that we learn best when our limitations are matched well with our choice in systems.  My systems are generally simple, perhaps because I'm pretty simple.  Also, I don't really need much.  When it comes down to actually trying to list everything that I use regularly, the list is really short.  Minimalism serves me well, perhaps that's not the case for everyone.  If not, then they should attempt to learn about the tools that they need, because not every day is sunny.

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#192 2013-06-30 22:52:43

ivanovnegro
Ivan #000000
From: unstable madness
Registered: 2011-06-02
Posts: 5,432

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Man, I never thought you would sound arrogant, even if you would, I would not have any problem with it.  cool

Do not oversee the smilies. I read your posts with pleasure.

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#193 2013-07-01 05:41:27

hhh
Caught in the Vortex
Registered: 2010-08-04
Posts: 2,902

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

@pidsley, DebianJoe, where are you installing cwm from? I used it and loved it for a while due to lusting after gutterslob's scrots (he's on spectrwm atm, I believe), but I had problems with my config file not being read. I finally got it to work with his help, but just recently tried it again using the Martin Toft download but ran into the same problem. I also remember one of the keyboard shortcuts (close a window, maybe?) being extremely awkward but never investigated changing it. But i miss this...
https://dumpyourphoto.com/files5/149775/pOg1WXlaDh.png

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#194 2013-07-01 05:58:57

hhh
Caught in the Vortex
Registered: 2010-08-04
Posts: 2,902

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Okay, it wasn't close a window, but it was one where your left hand contorts to hit the shortcut. And Joe, regarding Linux philosophy, I couldn't agree more. You know you're gone when you're trying to do something for the sake of coolness, and you know you're there when you screw everyone else's opinion and use what works for you. Installing and configuring cwm would be a leisure activity for me. I'm so happy I went back to squeeze and Gnome/Compiz or Gnome/Metacity (depending on my mood) that I could kiss everyone. Smooch. I'm already preparing for the mental anguish come June of next year when squeeze is really done.

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#195 2013-07-01 06:20:10

pidsley
Window Mangler
Registered: 2012-05-23
Posts: 1,752

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

hhh wrote:

@pidsley, DebianJoe, where are you installing cwm from?

It's not in the repo - you have to build it, and you want the git version so it will read the config file.

git clone git://github.com/chneukirchen/cwm.git

Last edited by pidsley (2013-07-01 06:23:49)

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#196 2013-07-01 06:42:41

hhh
Caught in the Vortex
Registered: 2010-08-04
Posts: 2,902

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Thanks, pidlsey! I'll be sure to post a scrot in a few days when I have it configured.

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#197 2013-07-01 07:31:16

DebianJoe
#! Code Whisperer
From: The Bleeding Edge
Registered: 2013-03-13
Posts: 1,207
Website

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Be sure to throw a beautiful config in this thread.  All I know how to do is make stuff work, but making it look nice is outside of my knowledge.  wink
(Reload config, OOTB is Ctrl+Alt+Shift+r...that's a monster of left hand bending, and if I hadn't been trained in emacs kung-fu, I'd probably rebind it as well.)

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#198 2013-07-02 04:19:49

hhh
Caught in the Vortex
Registered: 2010-08-04
Posts: 2,902

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Word, it compiled. For others who might want to give cwm a try (see Pidsley's link above for the git command), on my squeeze system I needed to install, besides build-essential and make, libfontconfig1-dev libxft-dev libxinerama-dev libxrandr-dev bison, then 'make && sudo make install' puts it in /usr/local/bin.

Pic or it didn't happen. cwm (borderwidth 2) with gnome-panel (since I already had it installed) and xcompmgr (which is too buggy, use compton or nothing)...
Screenshot_1.jpg

OK, back to my Compiz and/or Gnome2 setup and their wonderful GUI configuration tools. Even the little bit of configuration I did with cwm was a total pain. tongue

Last edited by hhh (2013-07-02 04:23:04)

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#199 2013-07-02 05:56:22

DebianJoe
#! Code Whisperer
From: The Bleeding Edge
Registered: 2013-03-13
Posts: 1,207
Website

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Pain is weakness leaving the body. big_smile

Part 2 of this project coming soon, perhaps with a working 64-bit sithWM.
(Currently repairing totally borked fstab... done gone horribly horribly wrong.  Posting this from a working laptop.)

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Be excellent to each other!

#200 2013-07-02 15:01:10

DebianJoe
#! Code Whisperer
From: The Bleeding Edge
Registered: 2013-03-13
Posts: 1,207
Website

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Making a Hardcore Bleeding-Edge Install

Before we begin, I'm not responsible for the horrible borkage that can potentially occur from the following process.  You may totally destroy the sun, thus casting us all into eternal darkness.  The Debian wiki will tell you "YOU'VE BEEN WARNED" should you look up the process, and if you cannot get around on the command line without any difficulty...then install Crunchbang or AntiX or a BBQ Blend...and be happy.  You can post your scrots and configure your conkys and brag about being minimal to all of your friends.

On the other hand if you juggle razor-blades, punch grizzly bears in the nuts, and want to be so bleeding-edge that you'll stab people accidentally on the subway...then carry on.  I'm not going to even pretend to be volunteering to be your tech-support, and the help-and-support guys here and on the Debian Forums will laugh at you if you present them with the problems that you'll probably run into, but this will create a killer system that will fly faster than light.  Also, you'll grow more chest-hair (this counts doubly for the ladies) from doing it this way.

This all started because I jacked my fstab file all up and forgot how I had assigned the 19 Partitions on my Toshiba lappy...and subsequently destrominated it.  At first, I fired up BBQ-Boner, but...I'm a puritan at heart.  If I'm going to make something minimal, then I'm going to not include something like zsh that I don't even know how to use yet.

So I grabbed a Wheezy Debian Net Install Disk that I had on the desk...more details here if you don't have one yet...and started building a new system.  You'll want a spare ethernet cable (because your wifi will be slow, and your drivers probably aren't free), and coffee.  I suggest a dark Italian blend, but I guess any coffee will do if you have enough.  We'll pick a point to make some espresso during this process, because watching the blue bar is boring.  Also, throw on some music.  I prefer Barry White and Death Metal, but whatever works for you.

Step 1:  Plug up the ethernet cable, and install Debian.  Figure out your own partitioning setup.  If you can't do this, turn back now.  You will reach a screen that says "Software Selection" and here you want to uncheck everything other than "Standard system utilities."  Use the spacebar to uncheck stuff.  Complete installation.

Step 2: If this went well, you'll end up being told to reboot.  When you do, you'll be greeted by a tty-term to login.  I add sudo at this point, and emacs...because I hate nano, but this is up to you.  Next, let's edit some stuff.  Use your terminal text editor (nano, emacs, vim) with sudo (you did use visudo to add your user, right?) to edit /etc/apt/sources.list:

deb http://http.us.debian.org/debian/ unstable main contrib non-free
deb-src http://http.us.debian.org/debian/ unstable main contrib non-free 

This enables sid repos.  Now we just:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

Step 3:  Go make that coffee we'd spoken about earlier.  You've got a minute.  Smart people would read the notices, but we're too hardcore for that.  At some point, you'll have to scroll past a warning or something (or press "q" to quit without wasting your time) and also let the computer restart services that it stops on its own....and then more scrolling text.  Some of it may say stuff like, "..this might mean that your installation is broken."  Cowboys don't care about this, and we're cowboys.

Step 4: Eventually, all of this text will drop you back out to a prompt.  Let's re-enter our /etc/apt/sources.list and add something totally sweet:

deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian/ experimental main contrib non-free

Save your file back, and at the prompt, re-update apt.

sudo apt-get update

Now would be a nice time to reboot.  Let's do that now.

Step 5:  Log back in.  You should be on kernel 3.9.-whatever right now.  Now, we can start picking cool stuff for our system to actually use.  We'll probably want X so we'll do that.  I have really fallen in love with cwm over the last few days, but I need to be able to make source files into stuff and also pull directly from repos so I'll:

sudo apt-get install xorg
sudo apt-get install xterm
sudo apt-get install build-essential
sudo apt-get install git

If you can find the WM you want without building it from source, then you're a plebeian and aren't hardcore.....I mean, use the package in the repos.  I luckily have hhh listing all of the packages that are needed in an above post, but if you wish, you can get "apt-file" from the debian repository and use it to search out what packages have the dependencies haven't been met.  I'm going to go ahead and grab feh, rxvt-unicode, moc, and tmux while I'm here.

Now, follow the instructions for setting up your WM.  You can use "startx" to make sure that X is working.  And then simply type "exit" at the tiny prompt to return to the original prompt.

Step 6: Now it's time to go shopping.  You can use Aptitude to pick out fun packages from Experimental, or you can start configuring your WM, or download more packages.  The most important thing is that now you can go to the Debian forums and troll people for asking questions that aren't hardcore.  Enjoy.  (I think I may also give myself an option to use sithwm as well....perhaps screenshots to come.)

Last edited by DebianJoe (2013-07-02 15:32:47)

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